Tag Archives for " Menopause "

PMS & Menopause – What are the Side Effects?

Although PMS and menopause are not the same, any woman who has experienced either knows none of the symptoms are easy to tolerate. PMS is the acronym representing pre-menstrual syndrome, and the condition most often occurs during the week before a woman gets her monthly period. Most of the physical symptoms that include tender breasts, cramps, weight gain, and pimples are familiar and a sure indication that the woman can expect her menstrual cycle soon. 

Some symptoms of PMS are not physical, although many women are still affected by their occurrence. These symptoms are categorized as emotional or behavioral and include difficulty sleeping, mood swings that are expressed through depression or crying, anger and the need to be alone. 

Perimenopause is a time of transition when a woman’s body is preparing for actual menopause. It can be a very confusing time with hormone changes and some of the symptoms of PMS. Many women experience periods that are heavier than usual that may include blood clots. During this transition time, the menstrual cycle can be very irregular and last longer than usual. 

Menopause is classified as the time when a woman’s ovaries have stopped producing progesterone and estrogen. These two hormones are needed to produce eggs, so it is no longer possible for the woman to conceive and bear a child. 

Menopausal symptoms can be challenging for many women, and most will state that the hot flashes are the worst. When a hot flash occurs there are sudden feelings of being extremely warm, sweating, flushing and some women experience a headache or nausea. Also known as flushes, this symptom usually continues up to 7 years even though some women are bothered by hot flashes and night sweats much longer. 

Although there is nothing women can do to avoid having hot flashes except hormone replacement therapy, avoiding caffeine, stress and alcohol may lessen the occurrence. More information about the symptoms of menopause are lowering the temperature of the bedroom at night can also be helpful in preventing hot flashes and night sweats. Sleeping in the nude is another way to stay more comfortable and have a better sleep. 

Common negative symptoms of menopause include depression, trouble sleeping, vaginal dryness, heart palpitations, and nausea. Doctors often recommend HRT (hormone replacement therapy) to alleviate some of these problems. Estrogen pills are commonly prescribed as a hormone replacement for menopausal women, but low dose estrogen is also available as a gel, spray or a vaginal ring

HRT may seem like a godsend to women who are very affected by the symptoms of menopause, but they require careful monitoring by their physician. There is some evidence that supplementing with estrogen may increase the risk of breast cancer. Women who have a history of the disease should avoid HRT by using one or more of the bioidentical or natural plant estrogens such as soy, flaxseed or red clover. 

Menopause is referred to as the “change of life,” and there is no doubt that it does change the life of every woman who experiences it. Once the worst symptoms are over, many women enjoy worry-free sex and freedom from monthly periods.

The-facts-about-menopause

The facts about menopause

Before you say goodbye to your period for good, there are certain things that each woman should know. The changes that your body is going through, affect everything from your heart, liver, kidneys to your veins, nerves and bones. No woman looks forward to her menopause because that period of life means sleep problems, hot flashes and other hormone changes that affect her mood and health as well.

If you didn’t pay special attention to your health while you were young, there are big chances that you will have serious health issues during menopause. It would be good for every woman to regularly inspect their body and do regular health checks before their menopause happens but also after it happens.

When it happens for the first time, you will feel a bit strange but you have to understand that just like your period, menopause is something that is completely normal in your cycle of life. There is nothing strange about it, it just happens. Such is the course of life events. Each woman has an individual menopause experience. Some important facts that each woman should know are as follows.

Menopause conditions

If you manage 12 months without menstruation, that basically means that you have hit menopause. It takes a year without a period so that a woman can know for certain that she is in her menopause. The most common age when menopause occurs is around 51 although if it happens before 40, that is commonly known as early menopause. Most of the time, early menopause is a result of a medical condition or it runs in your family.

Early menopause occurs with those women who had their ovaries removed due to their medical condition or any particular health issues. In such cases, early menopause occurs immediately upon removal. The most common menopause symptoms are weight gain and hot flashes. The first one we all know what it is and the hot flashes are sudden rushes of warmth or intense feeling that can last up to several minutes. It happens during the night and it is known as night sweats.

MENOPAUSE-AND-OSTEOPOROSIS

MENOPAUSE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

Without a doubt, the single most important concern of the menopausal woman remains osteoporosis. Osteoporosis can only be prevented with the correct forms of calcium and magnesium in the proper ratio, in conjunction with vitamin D and K.

Like menopause, osteoporosis does not occur suddenly, but rather gradually, with a decrease in the ovulatory cycles beginning between the ages of 45 to 55, the timing varies greatly from individual to individual.

Several symptoms and complaints occur in postmenopausal women. These symptoms and complaints are both physical and emotional. Listed below are the major physical and emotional symptoms of menopause.

WHAT IS OSTEOPOROSIS?

Osteoporosis is the normal loss of bone, which follows the menopause in women and occurs in all occurs in all individuals with advancing age.

Osteoporosis produces no symptoms or warning signs until a fracture occurs. Most typical are fractures of the wrist, hip, and collapse or ?crush? fractures of the spine, which produce deformity, loss of height, and severe curvature of the spine.

Osteoporosis develops less often in men than women because men have larger skeletons, bone loss starts later in life, and progresses more slowly.

There are multiple risk factors involved in osteoporosis. There are risk factors you cannot change and risk factors you can change.

RISK FACTORS YOU CANNOT CHANGE

AGE

osteoporosisThe older you are, the greater your risk of osteoporosis. As we grow older our bones become less dense and weaker, regardless of gender.

As we age bones become less dense and weaker, regardless of gender, and calcium absorption becomes less efficient.

ABSORPTION
Calcium absorption becomes less efficient as we age.

GENDER

Your chances of developing osteoporosis are 6 to 8 times greater if you are a woman than a man. Women have less bone tissue, begin to lose bone sooner, lose bone more rapidly than men, and calcium is drained from the bones during pregnancy and nursing.

BODY SIZE

Small, thin-bone women are at greater risk.

ETHNICITY

Caucasian and Asian women are at highest risk. African-American and Hispanic women have a lower but still significant risk.

HEREDITY/FAMILY HISTORY

People whose parents have a history of fractures are more likely to develop osteoporosis than those who do not have such a family history.

RISK FACTORS YOU CAN CHANGE

DIET

Clearly and indisputably the single most important factor in osteoporosis.

INACTIVITY

Research has clearly shown that physical inactivity and lack of exercise leads to bone loss, and lessens calcium absorption. Exercise increases the circulation and the absorption of calcium. It is very important to exercise at least five days a week moderately. At least 20 to 60 minutes per day without fail.

Swimming and bicycling are suggested. Increasingly doctors are recommending weight-bearing exercises such as brisk walking, aerobics, and light weightlifting.

MEDICATION

Some elements which are crucial to bone integrity can be blocked by others. For example, aluminum can block fluoride and calcium absorption which will reflect badly upon the health of your bones. Therefore it’s important to know what medications you take.