Tag Archives for " Osteoporosis "

MENOPAUSE-AND-OSTEOPOROSIS

MENOPAUSE AND OSTEOPOROSIS

Without a doubt, the single most important concern of the menopausal woman remains osteoporosis. Osteoporosis can only be prevented with the correct forms of calcium and magnesium in the proper ratio, in conjunction with vitamin D and K.

Like menopause, osteoporosis does not occur suddenly, but rather gradually, with a decrease in the ovulatory cycles beginning between the ages of 45 to 55, the timing varies greatly from individual to individual.

Several symptoms and complaints occur in postmenopausal women. These symptoms and complaints are both physical and emotional. Listed below are the major physical and emotional symptoms of menopause.

WHAT IS OSTEOPOROSIS?

Osteoporosis is the normal loss of bone, which follows the menopause in women and occurs in all occurs in all individuals with advancing age.

Osteoporosis produces no symptoms or warning signs until a fracture occurs. Most typical are fractures of the wrist, hip, and collapse or ?crush? fractures of the spine, which produce deformity, loss of height, and severe curvature of the spine.

Osteoporosis develops less often in men than women because men have larger skeletons, bone loss starts later in life, and progresses more slowly.

There are multiple risk factors involved in osteoporosis. There are risk factors you cannot change and risk factors you can change.

RISK FACTORS YOU CANNOT CHANGE

AGE

osteoporosisThe older you are, the greater your risk of osteoporosis. As we grow older our bones become less dense and weaker, regardless of gender.

As we age bones become less dense and weaker, regardless of gender, and calcium absorption becomes less efficient.

ABSORPTION
Calcium absorption becomes less efficient as we age.

GENDER

Your chances of developing osteoporosis are 6 to 8 times greater if you are a woman than a man. Women have less bone tissue, begin to lose bone sooner, lose bone more rapidly than men, and calcium is drained from the bones during pregnancy and nursing.

BODY SIZE

Small, thin-bone women are at greater risk.

ETHNICITY

Caucasian and Asian women are at highest risk. African-American and Hispanic women have a lower but still significant risk.

HEREDITY/FAMILY HISTORY

People whose parents have a history of fractures are more likely to develop osteoporosis than those who do not have such a family history.

RISK FACTORS YOU CAN CHANGE

DIET

Clearly and indisputably the single most important factor in osteoporosis.

INACTIVITY

Research has clearly shown that physical inactivity and lack of exercise leads to bone loss, and lessens calcium absorption. Exercise increases the circulation and the absorption of calcium. It is very important to exercise at least five days a week moderately. At least 20 to 60 minutes per day without fail.

Swimming and bicycling are suggested. Increasingly doctors are recommending weight-bearing exercises such as brisk walking, aerobics, and light weightlifting.

MEDICATION

Some elements which are crucial to bone integrity can be blocked by others. For example, aluminum can block fluoride and calcium absorption which will reflect badly upon the health of your bones. Therefore it’s important to know what medications you take.